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This site exists to make it easier to use Clojure rather than Scheme while working through SICP. The folks behind SICP were kind enough to release it under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 Unported License, which will allow me to annotate the text and adapt its source code and exercises to fit the Clojure language.

Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs, or SICP, is widely considered one of the most influential texts in computer science education. The cover of Structure and Interpretation of Computer ProgramsIf you believe Peter Norvig, it will change your life. MIT Scheme, a minimalist dialect of Lisp, is used for all code examples and exercises.

Clojure is a “modern” Lisp that runs on the Java Virtual Machine. Its speed, easy access to Java libraries, and focus on concurrency make it an appealing language for many applications.

This site exists to make it easier to use Clojure rather than Scheme while working through SICP. The folks behind SICP were kind enough to release it under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 Unported License, which will allow me to annotate the text and adapt its source code and exercises to fit the Clojure language.

All credit, of course, belongs to the authors: Harold Abelson and Gerald Jay Sussman, with Julie Sussman.

You should not be here yet.

Well, not really. You’re more than welcome to look around, if you’d like. I’ll avoid putting up any blinking lights and gifs of traffic cones, but this site is very much under construction. It’s going to take a long time before it’s complete, but right now it’s not even useful. Bookmark the site, maybe, and check back in a bit. Or, take a look at the status page for a better idea of where the project stands.